Tagged: trail running

Running jargon busting: race and course descriptions

When you’re trying to decide on a race to enter, you can spend ages comparing the various descriptions of them that organisers put up on their websites. Some are incredibly detailed, while some are unhelpfully brief. And often, they’re a little bit confusing.

You’ll often find that they’re peppered with odd phrases and bits of running shorthand that are, at times, a little ambiguous. One example of this is the term ‘undulating’, which crops up with unnatural frequency in race route descriptions. I explained the various meanings of undulating some time back, but there are plenty of other bits of jargon stuffed into race descriptions.

Here’s what some of them really mean…

Course profile descriptions

Flat: A bold statement, and reassurance that you can enjoy some hill-free running.

Pancake-flat: May actually be flatter than a flat course. Seriously, it’s likely to be flat.

PB friendly/PR friendly: Mostly flat, likely with a little bit of elevation change. You’ll find this phrase used quite a lot because, hey, who isn’t going to be tempted to enter a race on a course that’s easier to set a PB on. Because, let’s face it, finding a PB friendly course sounds a far easier of improving your time than training harder…

Undulating: a course that won’t be flat, but likely won’t be overly hilly. Or a somewhat hilly course that organisers don’t want to scare entrants off by describing as such. Read an expanded description of undulating here.

Undulating pic2

Challenging: There will be hills, and they will be steep.

Tough: There will be lots of hills, and they will be very steep.

‘You’ll enjoy the views’/‘Worth it for the views’: The ‘it’ mentioned here is, of course, a relentless grind up one or more ridiculously steep hills.

wimbledon2

Brutal: Ye Gods.

Scenic: This sounds like it is a welcome description for a race, suggesting you’ll have nice things to look at. Usually it is, although beware: if this is the only descriptor used for a race, it might be because describing the course with any other terms would involve admitting it’s a grindingly difficult course that takes in hill after hill after hill.

Race course types

Out-and-back: This is a course that involves running somewhere, turning round and heading back. At it’s most extreme, the turning point is occasionally a traffic cone in the middle of the road.

Single lap: A course that starts and finishes in the same place, taking in one big loop. Always a good option if you like plentiful variety.

Multi-lap: A course that will take in two or more loops of a particular section of course. This is both good and bad. It’s good because you’ll know what you’re in for on the second lap, and can adjust your efforts to suit. It’s bad if the loop is particularly dull, or if it contains a tough hill – knowing you’ve got to run up a hill a second time can be a little demotivating…

Point-to-point: A course that stars somewhere, and finishes somewhere else. These offer maximum running variety pleasure, but can be a bit tough for logistics. Although when a point-to-point course is well organised – such as the London Marathon – you’d almost never know.

Surface types

All-asphalt/all-Tarmac: Yes, this will be a course that takes place entirely on a sealed surface course. That doesn’t necessarily mean it will be as smooth as you’d think

Closed-road: The route will take place on roads closed to traffic so, in theory, only runners will be on them. This is good, as it removes the always unwelcome prospect of being squeezed to the side by over-aggressive drivers who don’t think they should have to account for people running on a road (because they’re far more important, obviously).

Open-road: This route will take place on roads which are open to traffic. Which raises the, erm, always unwelcome prospect of being squeezed to the side of the road by over-aggressive drivers who don’t think they should have to account for people running on a road (because they’re far more important, obviously). To be fair, most motorists are very decent people who won’t mind slowing down and giving you room. Sadly, there are always exceptions to the rule, etc…

Mostly smooth with some slippery bits: there’ll probably be grass or mud. Beware if it gets wet

Occasionally muddy in places: will almost certainly be muddy in places.

Muddy in places: Pack your wellies.

Mixed-surface: This means the race will take place on – shock! – a mixture of surfaces. Expect it to be mostly fairly smooth stuff, but be ready for a bit of on-grass action and the potential for some mud.

Trail course: An off-road course. Probably bumpy. Mud often involved.

Other terms

Race village/race festival: A selection of stands selling running products, offering massages and that sort of time. Sometimes these will be massive. Often they’ll be two stalls in the middle of a big field.

Club/county championship round: runs that are rounds of club championships will often attract higher numbers of runners than other events. And when you get to the start you’ll find most of them are wearing various brightly colours club running tops. But you don’t usually have to be a member of a club to do them.

Accurately measured: Some races really seem to push the fact that they’ve accurately measured the course to make sure it’s the distance that they’re advertising. Which seems an odd thing to advertise, because when you’re entering a 10k race, you’d basically expect the organisers would have checked the course was, you know, 10k long. Although a surprising amount aren’t. And yes, that includes many described as being ‘accurately measured’.

distance-2

Certified course: Usually followed by a bunch of initials that are the name of a national governing body. This means the course has been verified by some official types as being of the correct length, so any record times set on it can enter the history books. Which matters, because of course you’re going to be running at world record pace (alright, it has an impact on club points and the like too…)

Read more running jargon busting here.

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Weekend update: Escape to the country

The London Marathon takes place, fairly obviously, in London. The middle of London, to be even more precise. It runs past the Queen’s house and everything.

So today, in an effort to mix up and improve my training for a run right in the middle of Britain’s biggest city… I drove away from it and headed for the country. It made sense at the time, honest.

The theory is pretty sound. Most of my training has taken place near where I live in the borough of Richmond-upon-Thames. I’m fabulously lucky: I live within the M25, yet within minutes of my house I can run huge lengths of the River Thames towpath, two huge royal deer parks (one with hills, one without) and any number of reasonably quiet rural roads and smaller parks.

Even so, and even mixing up the routes I take, it can get a bit repetitive running in the same area all the time. So I arranged to meet up with fellow South West Children’s Heart Circle charity marathon entrant Matt Burt at his place down the M3, before heading into the countryside for a bit of rural trail running.

We chose a section of the long-distance Test Way Footpath in Hampshire. The bit we aimed for, starting in the village of Fullerton, just south of Andover, was made out of the disused Spratt and Winkle railway line. And yes, the name Spratt and Winkle line made me chuckle too. Just because.

What followed was a solid 16.7 miles of trail running on a flat, largely straight path, with occasional muddy patches to add a bit of drama. On a lovely British Spring day it was really very pleasant: fresh air, peace and quiet. Really, it was such a far cry from the packed streets of central London that I’ll hopefully be running through in six weeks time.

Despite the contrast, the change of scenery was really refreshing for what could otherwise have been a boring distance training run. And that could set me up nicely when heading back to London Town.

Oh, and one more observation: pretty much everyone we passed on the path – whether walker, runner or cyclist – said hello and smiled. Which builds on my recent theory that runners, and people in general, are generally nicer the further away from the city you get…

I’m running the 2016 London Marathon to raise money for the South West Children’s Heart Circle. Help support the families of young children undergoing heart surgery by clicking the ‘Just Giving’ button and donating. Thanks!
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